Child Support in Alaska

The Alaska Child Support Services Program follows the directives established by Congress in 1975 that required all states in the U.S. to set up services and collection programs. The main point of contact for those applying for child support is the Child Support Services Division that includes the field offices of Juneau, Fairbanks, and Wasilla, and the Outreach staff. The actual child support services are divided into four sections including the Establishment, Enforcement, Review, Modifications and Interstate (to get child support from parents not in the state) and accessible both online and off line. For more information in general about the process works you can go to http://www.childsupport.alaska.gov/Overview.asp

The Alaska Child Support Establishment Section

Nothing goes forward in Alaska until paternity is determined. After this is verified then the staff calculates support payments and moderates disputes. A father can willingly acknowledge support up until the time of the child’s eighteenth birthday by signing a form from the Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics.

Support orders are not established for a child who is born to unmarried parents unless the paternity is confirmed so it is best to prove this as soon as possible after the child’s birth. If the male parent does not cooperate, then the State of Alaska may issue a court-order for painless, accurate genetic testing.

The Alaska Child Support Modification Section

Child support payments are based on what the noncustodial parent earns. To be the custodial parent, the child must live with you seventy percent of the time. The court rule says that the noncustodial parent of one child should pay 20% of his adjusted income to support one child. Adjusted income is your earnings after deductions for taxes, union dues and retirement. For more information about how this is calculated go to FAQ section of the Alaska Child Support Services Division at http://www.childsupport.alaska.gov/FAQ/FAQ_Establishing_Calculating.asp.

If a parent’s financial situation changes, then either parent can ask the State of Alaska for a hearing so that the original amount that was ordered can be evaluated for modification. An office that is appointed by the Department of Revenue rules the hearing.

If the noncustodial parent lives outside of Alaska, in another state, then the case is initiated in that other state who then attempts to locate the parent and start proceedings to establish paternity and collect support. Federal law requires that all states cooperate with each other when it comes to handling requests for child support.

All of the applications that you need to apply for child support in Alaska can be found here at http://www.childsupport.alaska.gov/Forms/forms.asp